Guide to Creating a Signup Form

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Overview 

Learn how to get started with Klaviyo signup forms to connect with your site visitors, grow your email and SMS lists, and build long-lasting customer relationships. 

By following a few key principles, you can have a beautiful, high-converting signup form live on your website in just a few minutes. Start by setting a goal for your form; then, add content and design it to meet your goal. Once the form is built, you can publish it to your website with just a few clicks. 

For a deeper dive into subscriber acquisition best practices, head to our course Creating an Effective Acquisition Strategy Using Signup Forms

Before You Begin

Before you begin, integrate your website with Klaviyo. If you use an ecommerce platform that has a pre-built Klaviyo integration, like Shopify, BigCommerce, or WooCommerce, make sure your integration is live and that you’ve enabled Active on Site tracking. 

  • For Shopify, Active on Site tracking is enabled through Klaviyo’s app embed
  • For WooCommerce, it’s enabled automatically once you integrate. 
  • For BigCommerce, you must check the setting Automatically add Klaviyo onsite JavaScript
  • If you use a platform that doesn’t have a pre-built Klaviyo integration, install Klaviyo’s onsite JavaScript (Klaviyo.js) by pasting a small snippet of code on your site before you begin. 

Guiding Principles for Signup Forms

Following these three principles will help you design a successful signup form:

  • Keep your style simple
    When you pack too much into a single form, you distract from your form’s main goal and make it harder for a site visitor to say “yes.” Keep it simple so it’s as easy as possible for your visitors to understand and fill out your form.
  • Design for the total experience
    It’s easy to get lost trying to find the perfect color or layout. Successful signup forms are about more than just a first impression. When designing your next form, consider your subscribers’ experiences before, during, and after they encounter your form.
  • Collect the right data
    Most signup forms ask for your email address or phone number, but more data can help you build powerful connections with subscribers. Knowing when to ask for more, and what to ask for, will help make it a no-brainer for subscribers to tell you more about themselves.

Create a Basic Form 

Before you start building a form, consider your goals. A form can help you connect with potential customers, learn more about your audience, convert email subscribers to SMS subscribers, and more. A simple new prospect acquisition form (to collect the contact information of a person who has visited your site, but never purchased) is a great place to start. 

Build Your Form

Once you’ve decided on a goal for your form, head to the Signup Forms tab. To create a form, you can either use a template from Klaviyo’s Form Library or start from scratch. The forms found in the Form Library are designed with best practices in mind, and it’s easy to customize them to match your brand. 

Once you choose your base template, add or edit the form’s fields to match your goal. For example, if your goal is to grow your subscriber list, a simple form with an email field may be best. If you offer a discount or gift to encourage visitors to subscribe, make sure to feature that in the form.

Target Your Form

Based on your form’s goals, adjust the settings in the Behaviors and Targeting section. You can target a form based on a visitor’s location, device type, list membership, and more. 

For a simple list growth popup, the following behavior settings are a good place to start: 

  • Display Timing 
    • Loading delay: Show 3 seconds after page load
  • Display Frequency 
    • Don’t show again after submit form or Go to URL action 
    • Show again 90 days after closing 
  • Devices
    • Show on: Desktop and Mobile
  • Targeting
    • By visitor > Target visitors in a list or segment: Don’t show to visitors in a certain list or segment > [your main list] 

If you’d like to test your behavior and targeting settings, consider using an A/B test to experiment.

Design Your Form

Once you’ve chosen your form’s content and targeting, head to the Styles section. Here, you can apply your brand’s styles and make the finishing touches before publishing. Recall the first guiding principle: Keep your style simple. When someone looks at your form, they should be able to understand what the form is asking for (and how to close it) with just a glance. If not, consider simplifying your form’s design, so the most important elements are easy to understand. 

Form Types

When choosing form styles, double check that your form type (i.e., popup, flyout, or embed) matches your form’s goal. Consider the characteristics of each form type: 

  • Popups appear in the middle of a browser window, which makes them eye-catching and high converting. However, too many popups (or a popup at the wrong time) can be annoying or distracting to a potential customer. 
  • Flyouts are less intrusive than popups, but still noticeable, as they fly onto the edge of the page rather than in the middle. They generally allow a visitor to keep browsing without interacting with or closing the form.
  • Embed forms are embedded on a specific page or section of your site, like your footer. Embeds are helpful for visitors who come to your site with the intention of subscribing, but may not trigger a popup or flyout. Consider including an embed form in your footer in addition to any popup or flyout forms you build. 

General Form Styles

When choosing fonts and colors for your form, consider accessibility best practices. Use colors with high contrast to ensure it’s easy for all visitors to read the form’s content. Learn more about accessibility in design.

For a deep dive into brand design, head to our guide Basics of Brand Design

Additional Steps and Success Messages

If you’d like to minimize the number of fields on your form, but still provide subscribers the opportunity to share more about themselves, consider using a multi-step form. With a multi-step form, you can add additional pages and ask subscribers for optional information, like their name or interests. 

Whether you use the multi-step feature or not, click Success to view and edit the form’s success message. This will appear to anyone who successfully completes the form, unless your form is set to close or go to a URL upon submission. 

Add Your Form to Your Website

Once your form is ready to share, click Publish. As long as you’ve integrated your site with Klaviyo, there’s nothing else you need to do to launch a popup or flyout form. If you’re publishing an embed form, there’s just one final step: paste the form’s embed code onto your site. 

If your website platform doesn’t integrate with Klaviyo directly, install klaviyo.js by pasting a small snippet of code on your site to enable your forms to appear. 

To view and test your signup form, head to your website. Try using an incognito browser if your form is set to be hidden from existing Klaviyo profiles. Make sure you meet all the form’s targeting criteria. For example, if you have a form set to show after three seconds and when exit intent is shown, wait three seconds for the page to load. Then, show exit intent by quickly moving your cursor towards the “close” button for your tab (or quickly scrolling upward on mobile). Note that all criteria must be met (the time delay and exit intent, in this case) for the form to appear.

In the subsequent hours and days after your form is set live, site visitors will see it and may complete it. View your form’s results in your Form Analytics

Follow Up on Your Offer

If your signup form includes an incentive for signing up (like free shipping or a discount on an order), new subscribers will expect to be able to use the offer right away. Use a welcome flow to deliver on your offer and start to build brand awareness and loyalty. 

Your welcome flow should use your signup form’s list as the trigger, and the first email should be sent right away. You can add additional messages or reminders to use their coupon a few days later. 

If you want to experiment and identify the best incentive for your audience, consider A/B testing your signup form offer

Manage Your Forms 

Navigate to the Signup Forms tab to see a list of all the forms in your account. A green dot indicates a live form, a gray dot indicates a draft form, and a green circle indicates a form that is live, but has unpublished edits. 

list_statuses.jpg

To pause a live form without deleting it, open the form and select Draft from the dropdown in the top right. This will remove the form from your site, and you can always return and reactivate it at a later time. 

To rename, clone, or delete a form, head to the Signup Forms tab and use the button with three dots to access form management options. 

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Change the List a Form Submits To

To change the list a form submits to, open up the form’s editor. Click the main button block in your form; then, in the Button Click Action section, select a new list under List to Submit.

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Review Your Data

Once you’ve collected a few subscribers, you can review the information they’ve shared in their profiles. Search for a person’s name or email address to find them. Then, scroll down to their Information section to see the data they shared in the form. 

To learn more about reviewing your signup form data, head to our article: How to View Form Responses

Level Up Your Signup Forms 

Ready to take your list growth program to the next level? Try optimizing your forms for mobile devices, using a multi-step form, or offering tiered discounts to different customer groups

For a deep dive into building your signup form strategy, register for our course Creating an Effective Acquisition Strategy Using Signup Forms 

Additional Resources 



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